“…From many sides, from many sides.”

The Confusion from the Commander-in-Chief

During the campaign at one of Donald J. Trump strident rallies he said, “Anyone who cannot name our enemy, is not fit to lead this country.” All the things he has said have come back to bite him. And now we witness the President revealed once again. He has this problem when he talks. He can’t seem to say bad things about Putin or about Alt-right, Neo-Nazi and White Nationalists. Why? Whose team is this man on?

Indeed, Donald Trump is a President the likes of which no one has ever seen. And now we’ve had two major events that really bring a burning feeling to the surface of our citizens. Possible war with North Korea and a domestic threat from hate groups in our homeland streets. Commenting on both incidents, the President used the wrong words.

We always want to believe the President of the United States has some moral core that drives his speech and his actions. Honest, direct communication not only creates trust, but also gives Americans a sense of grounding. But what we have here is a man who obsesses on things about himself and how they make him look.

Trump surrounds himself with people like Stephen Miller, Steve Bannon, Sebastian Gorka and Michael Anton, who all carry heavy-dark-dogmas on their backs. How can Donald Trump be objective on race and equality, when he is being counter-programmed by people who see disruption as getting things done?

You can google the names above and read their backgrounds and the things they have said and become familiar with the riffraff the Donald decided to help him with this messaging. They are controlling this President 100 times more than Dick Cheney’s influence on George W. Bush. They are literally writing the words Teleprompter Trump reads.

General McMaster on Meet the Press (8-13-2017) said that the President doesn’t draw a red line. While the phrases “Fire and Fury, like the world has never seen” and announcing that we are “Locked and Loaded” were used to demonstrate the President’s possible retaliation on a country, Trump has yet to develop and disclose a plan. The only reason he doesn’t use the term “red line” is because Obama used that terminology. Whatever Obama did, Trump must do the opposite. Why?

There was a biblical quality in what our great Orange Leader said in his threats toward North Korea, but there are other good book references standing by if Trump runs out of rhetoric. There’s “death and destruction” and, even stronger, “Wrath, wailing, and woe,” or maybe Trump can use this one, “we will wreck and lay waste all your cities and poison the earth, the water, and the air.” But this assumes that the Donald has ever read the bible.

Of course, he hasn’t gone far enough yet. He still has “All the generations to come will be born crippled and twisted, and the living will envy the dead.” He should think about talking to the young North Korea dictator and come up with some Win-Win deal. Say, isn’t this President the guy who said he wrote The Art of the Deal?

Back at home, the deaths last weekend in Charlottesville, VA made the whole world watch and wait for the President to voice our position. What we got wasn’t our voice, but a rather strange grouping of words. He used his speech to distance himself from criticism of the hate groups. I yelled at the TV, “You son-of-a-bitch!” We were waiting for a President to step up and what we got was a fall guy for the white guys. Then he peppered his speech with the words “law and order” code for police brutality in the Black community. Next, not missing a beat, the Donald jumped to selling what a great job he is doing as President. Really?

Trump’s comments were designed to make sure the President didn’t anger the far Alt-Right, neo-Nazis and White Nationalists. However, the use of the words, “We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides, on many sides,” angered many Democrats and some Republicans.

Being hyper-analytical here, when the President said, “strongest possible terms,” without using strong definitive terms he wasn’t being specific. If fact, the far-right neo-Nazis front took the President’s words as an endorsement of sorts.

That brings me to a question that I must ask, “If you are protesting hate, why are you awarded an equal amount of hate?” If I dislike someone’s views and I think my responsibility as the caretaker of common sense and American Democracy is to raise my voice against the hate, why do you label me a hater?

People who think Hitler was cool, are sick. People who believe that being white gives one an advantage to rule are bigoted small-minded terrorists. If you are someone who carries the myth of white supremacy to the point you join a group like the KKK, you are far out of the mainstream and endorsing the sins of others, you know, lynching, church burnings, murdering and, now, running your car into a crowd.

The visual of the torches in Charlottesville on Friday night was the final straw for many people. It was too close to the pain and hate of the past. The stars and bars, swastikas, weapons, military garb and weapons crossed a line, a deep red, white and blue line.

Trump is the wrong President for the United States. History will show how destructive he was for America. It’s time for us to fix the present situation. If I could condemn, in the strongest possible terms, what Trump is doing to my beloved country, I would simply say, “He’s the worst President, the likes of which no one has ever seen.” We need to hit the reset button.